When Alaska couples divorce and one parent ends up as the non-custodial parent, it can be terrifying to think of a future without everyday access to the kids. As parents find a new normal, there must be ways to not only co-parent, but to maintain strong relationships between the children and the parent they do not live with.

According to HelpGuide.org, consistency is key in building relationships with kids, especially as they adjust to the new terms of life after divorce. Parents should show up when they say they will and give the children security about what they can expect from each parent.

One of the worst things parents can do with their kids is to take out their anger with their ex on them, or discuss their hurt feelings with them. It can be tempting because the kids spend time with the ex and it is easy to complain about things they do, but it creates an emotional divide between the parent who is critical. If this is the non-custodial parent, it is hard to maintain a relationship that feels negative to them.

Verywellfamily.com also suggests that parents rely on each other for babysitting duties. If one parent has plans and needs childcare, the non-custodial parent can take advantage of extra, unexpected time with the kids by covering. This not only strengthens the relationship with the kids, but also builds camaraderie between the two exes.

Many times, fathers end up as the non-custodial parent and have to make a conscious effort to build strong relationships with their kids. While this may be an unexpected difficulty that comes with divorce, it is possible with commitment.