Wyatt & Butterfield, LLC - Family Law

We Can Help. Call Now.

FAMILY LAW FOR MEN.
ESTATE PLANNING AND ELDER LAW FOR EVERYONE.

FAMILY LAW FOR MEN.
ESTATE PLANNING AND ELDER LAW FOR EVERYONE.

  1. Home
  2.  → 
  3. Family Law For Fathers
  4.  → How much is child support?

How much is child support?

| Feb 7, 2020 | Family Law For Fathers | 0 comments

Child support is an important aspect of family law and custody proceedings, and you may wonder how much you need to pay if you and the child’s other parent are going through divorce. In Alaska, you have an obligation to support your children, and this is something that the courts cannot waive. Typically, the parenting plan the court chooses determines how much you owe. According to the Alaska Court System, there are four different parenting plans:

  • Shared
  • Primary
  • Divided
  • Hybrid

Each plan involves a formula that outlines how much you owe in support and how frequently you make these payments.

Typically, the judge calculates support based off your gross income while considering any deductions. Deductions can be anything from taxes to union dues, and it is important to be aware of all of the deductions you can claim. Once the judge considers the deductions, you normally pay a percentage of this adjusted income, and the judge applies this to how many kids you have: more kids = more financial support. Rarely, there can be variations in the rules, but you should not expect this as it does not normally happen.

Although the calculation is typically straightforward, other notable components are you may be eligible for the income cap rule if your salary is greater than $126,000. It is also possible that the custodial parent could appeal to have child support paid from the time of separation even if the separation occurred many years before. Child support is not optional, and it is vital to understand the documents and procedures involved as early as possible.

Archives