Studies show that children benefit from positive relationships with adult family members. This encompasses more than mom and dad. Bonds with aunts, uncles and grandparents in Alaska can impact the child’s happiness throughout their lives and improve the wellbeing of the entire family. When parents get divorced, maintaining those close family connections is critical. 

Considerable reports that a result of the landmark Supreme Court case, Troxel v. Granville, it is virtually impossible for grandparents to be a part of a child’s life without filing a lawsuit if the parent with physical custody denies access. In some cases, as in the court case, the parent is not against their child continuing a relationship. It is simply too difficult as a single parent to add another requirement to their already hectic schedule. 

Maintain Family Ties 

If spending time with your grandchildren is a priority, here are some tips that may help you make it easier for the single parent. 

Offer to help with the kids, especially if they are young. Driving them to and from school or extracurricular activities and helping with homework can make a single parent’s days much easier. The fact that the child is with a family member can also help reduce the stress of leaving him or her with a babysitter, not to mention, alleviate the financial strain. 

With the parent’s approval, plan a vacation or a weekend getaway with the entire family. Rent a cottage and take everyone to the lake or go on a cruise or another excursion that not only lets you spend time with your grandchild but also lets the parent get some down-time. 

Go to sporting events, plays, concerts or any activity in which your grandchild participates. This indicates your commitment to being a part of the child’s life. The parent may come around and be more open to allowing you a greater involvement. 

If your grandchild’s welfare is in danger, you must have substantial proof to remove him or her from the parent’s care. However, there are situations in which you can petition the court for custody.