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Family Law For Fathers Archives

Post-divorce parenting

When couples in Alaska divorce, emotions often run high. This is especially true when the spouses have minor children and must now negotiate issues such as child support and custody. In most cases, both mothers and fathers are committed to doing what is best for the children, even if the divorce has led to resentment.

Fathers have an important role to play

Many fathers in Alaska do not have physical custody of their children, but that does not mean they are uninvolved in their children's lives. For example, many non-custodial parents share legal custody of the kids, meaning that they have a right to participate in the major decisions about a child's upbringing, education and health care. In addition, many fathers who do not have custody do have extensive visitation rights and are paying child support to cover their kids' expenses.

How fathers should act during custody proceedings

Both mothers and fathers in Alaska have the right to pursue custody of their children. However, there are certain tips that fathers should remember when going through the process. For example, dads will benefit from a solid relationship with their children. This may mean calling regularly or otherwise making sure that the child understands that their father is available at any time.

How paternity can be established

There are a number of reasons that unmarried fathers in Alaska may need to establish paternity, many of which are done for the benefit of the child. One argument is that children should have the opportunity to know their fathers. Another reason is that it establishes a father's legal obligation to pay child support. Establishing paternity also makes a child eligible for various benefits, such as Social Security or inheritances. Finally, it may help the child to learn about any genetic medical conditions that could arise.

Fathers can help their kids to deal with divorce

Many fathers in Alaska may be concerned about the impact of divorce on their relationship with their children. Being separated from and losing his or her connection with his or her kids can be a major concern for any divorcing parent, but especially for fathers. However, keeping some key guidelines in mind throughout the process should help fathers build a supportive environment for their children that fosters the relationship long after the divorce is finalized.

Fathers may be entitled to custody too

While mothers may be thought of as the principal caretaker in a child's life, this is not always the case. As a general rule, fathers in Alaska and throughout the United States have the right to seek custody of their children. Obtaining custody allows them to make decisions for their children. The ideal scenario may be one in which parents share custody. However, this isn't always feasible.

Circumstances that influence visitation rights for fathers

Family courts in Alaska determine visitation and custody arrangements for parents who are seeking a divorce or were never married. People have the right to create a visitation schedule between themselves without a court having to impose a decision. Their separation or divorce agreements could explain the scheduling and duration of visitations. These are known as reasonable visitation rights because they were worked out by parents capable of communicating and cooperating.

Paternity can establish your right to raise your child

Alaska fathers may not have been married when their children were born, but that does not mean they aren't rightful parents. If you break up with the mother, however, you might not be able to see your child again unless you take legal action.

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