Search

Posts tagged "Family Law For Husbands"

Tax tips for going through a divorce

Married couples who are separating in Alaska should be aware that tax laws regarding alimony will change for divorce agreements that are completed after the end of 2018. Starting on Jan. 1, 2019, alimony will no longer be tax-deductible for payers or tax-payable for recipients. Experts say that this is likely to mean less money for both parties.

Divorce and dividing assets

Couples in Alaska who are getting a divorce should understand how dividing certain types of assets will affect them tax-wise. For example, many spouses do not pursue their share of other assets in order to retain ownership of the family home. However, because of changes in the tax law, it could more expensive than they thought to own the home.

Regaining custody of a child

Alaska fathers who have lost custody of their children may be able to get it back. The first step in the process is to determine why custody was taken away. In some cases, it may be because a father violated a court order or is being accused of abusing or neglecting the child. Therefore, a judge determined that it wasn't in the child's best interest for a dad to retain custody.

How new alimony tax rules may affect retirement savings

Because of changes related to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), alimony payers in Alaska will no longer be allowed to deduct payments for tax purposes. Recipients will also no longer have to pay taxes on payments. Additionally, the TCJA rule changes will affect retirement account options for divorced couples on either side of the alimony equation. However, the new law will not apply to alimony arrangements already in place before the TCJA officially goes into effect.

Things to avoid in coparenting

Parents in Alaska who are getting a divorce may face some challenges, but they can take steps to make coparenting less difficult. For example, parents should make a plan to communicate about any parenting issues that may arise. They should not use their children as conduits for communication between parents.

Crafting the ideal child custody schedule

Some divorced Alaska parents might question whether their child custody arrangement is a proper one. The truth is that any custody arrangement is proper as long as it works for the parents and the child. Although a common arrangement sees the noncustodial parent visiting the children on alternating weekends, this is not the only one that can be devised. For instance, a child could visit with a noncustodial parent after school or one evening a week.

You are not alone. We are here for you. Let us be your voice.

How Can We Help You?

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Email Us For A Response

Wyatt & Butterfield, LLC
310 K Street Suite 200
Anchorage, AK 99501

Phone: 907-331-6979
Fax: 888-455-1236
Anchorage Law Office Map